La Gazza Ladra

 

Melodramma or opera semiseria in two acts by Gioachino Rossini, with a libretto by Giovanni Gherardini based on La pie voleuse by Théodore Baudouin d'Aubigny and Louis-Charles Caigniez.Wikipedia

  • La pietra del paragone

    Opera, or melodramma giocoso, in two acts by Gioachino Rossini, to an original Italian libretto by Luigi Romanelli. First performed at La Scala, Milan, on 26 September 1812.Wikipedia

  • La zingara

    Opera semiseria in two acts by Gaetano Donizetti, set to a libretto by Andrea Leone Tottola after La petite bohémienne (The Little Gypsy) by Louis-Charles Caigniez, which was itself derived from a work of August von Kotzebue. Donizetti's first opera written for Naples, and the first performance of this 'rescue opera' took place at the Teatro Nuovo on 12 May 1822.Wikipedia

  • Bianca e Falliero

    Two-act operatic melodramma by Gioachino Rossini to an Italian libretto by Felice Romani. Based on Antoine-Vincent Arnault's play Les Vénitiens, ou Blanche et Montcassin.Wikipedia

  • Semiramide

    Opera in two acts by Gioachino Rossini. Based on Voltaire's tragedy Semiramis, which in turn was based on the legend of Semiramis of Assyria.Wikipedia

  • Benvenuto Cellini (opera)

    Opera semiseria in two acts with music by Hector Berlioz and libretto by Léon de Wailly and Henri Auguste Barbier. The first of Berlioz's operas, premiered at the Académie Royale de Musique on 10 September 1838.Wikipedia

  • Il turco in Italia

    Opera buffa in two acts by Gioachino Rossini. Written by Felice Romani.Wikipedia

La Gazza Ladra, an opera buffa on two acts by Gioacchino Rossini, was given its premier performance at La Scala, Milan, May 31, 1817, about fourteen months after the debut of his The Barber of Seville.

  1. The period between La gazza ladra (1817) and Semiramide (1823) was marked by the production of twelve operas of little significance, with the exception of La donna del lago. La donna del lago-Wikipedia. In 1941 he re-orchestrated La gazza ladra, reducing it to three acts.
  2. Rossini:Ouverture 'La Gazza Ladra' - Boian Videnoff指揮Mannheimer Philharmonikerによる演奏。Mannheimer Philharmoniker公式YouTube。 G.Rossini - La Gazza Ladra, Overture - Leonardo Catalanotto指揮Orchestra Del Teatro Massimo Belliniによる演奏。当該指揮者自身の公式YouTube。.
Ladra
  • Elisa e Claudio

    Two-act melodramma semiseria by the 19th Century Italian composer Saverio Mercadante from a libretto by Luigi Romanelli based on the play, Rosella by Filipo Casari. It received its premiere performance at La Scala in Milan on 30 October 1821.Wikipedia

  • The Barber of Seville

    Opera buffa in two acts by Gioachino Rossini with an Italian libretto by Cesare Sterbini. Based on Pierre Beaumarchais's French comedy Le Barbier de Séville .Wikipedia

  • Gianni di Calais

    Melodramma semiserio, a 'semi-serious' opera in three acts by Gaetano Donizetti , from a libretto by Domenico Gilardoni, based on Jean de Paris by Louis-Charles Caigniez. First performed on 2 August 1828 at the Teatro del Fondo, Naples.Wikipedia

  • La Cenerentola

    Operatic dramma giocoso in two acts by Gioachino Rossini. Written by Jacopo Ferretti, based on the libretti written by Charles-Guillaume Étienne for the opera Cendrillon , with music by Nicolas Isouard (first performed Paris, 1810) and by Francesco Fiorini for Agatina o La virtù premiata, with music by Stefano Pavesi (first performed Milan, 1814).Wikipedia

  • Fausta (opera)

    Melodramma, or opera seria, in two acts by Gaetano Donizetti. Partly written by Domenico Gilardoni, who died while doing so: the remainder was written by Donizetti.Wikipedia

  • Chiara e Serafina

    Opera semiseria in two acts by Gaetano Donizetti to a libretto by Felice Romani, based on the melodrama La cisterne by René Charles Guilbert de Pixérécourt. Premiered on October 26, 1822, but was not a success.Wikipedia

  • Aureliano in Palmira

    Operatic dramma serio in two acts written by Gioachino Rossini to an Italian libretto in which the librettist was credited only by the initials 'G. F. R.' The libretto has generally been attributed to Giuseppe Felice Romani, but sometimes to the otherwise unknown Gian Francesco Romanelli.Wikipedia

  • Maometto II

    1820 opera in two acts by Gioachino Rossini to an Italian libretto by Cesare della Valle. Commissioned by the Teatro di San Carlo in Naples.Wikipedia

  • William Tell (opera)

    French-language opera in four acts by Italian composer Gioachino Rossini to a libretto by Victor-Joseph Étienne de Jouy and L. F. Bis, based on Friedrich Schiller's play William Tell, which, in turn, drew on the William Tell legend. Rossini's last, although he lived for nearly 40 more years.Wikipedia

  • Gianni di Parigi

    1839 melodramma comico in two acts with music by Gaetano Donizetti to a libretto by Felice Romani, which had previously been set by Francesco Morlacchi in 1818 and by Giovanni Antonio Speranza in 1836. Derived from Jean de Paris, an 1812 opera by François-Adrien Boieldieu with a libretto by Claude Godard d'Aucourt de Saint-Just, which had been performed in Naples in 1816.Wikipedia

  • Armida (Rossini)

    Opera in three acts by Italian composer Gioachino Rossini to an Italian libretto by Giovanni Schmidt, based on scenes from Gerusalemme liberata by Torquato Tasso. Written to be performed at the Teatro di San Carlo, Naples, on 11 November 1817 to celebrate the opening of the rebuilt opera house, which had been destroyed by fire the previous year.Wikipedia

  • Tancredi

    Melodramma eroico in two acts by composer Gioachino Rossini and librettist Gaetano Rossi (who was also to write Semiramide ten years later), based on Voltaire's play Tancrède (1760). The opera made its first appearance at the Teatro La Fenice in Venice on 6 February 1813, and because Il signor Bruschino premiered in late January, the composer must have completed Tancredi in less than a month.Wikipedia

  • Ermione

    Tragic opera (azione tragica) in two acts by Gioachino Rossini to an Italian libretto by Andrea Leone Tottola, based on the play Andromaque by Jean Racine. 19th centuryWikipedia

  • Torvaldo e Dorliska

    Operatic dramma semiserio in two acts by Gioachino Rossini to an Italian libretto by Cesare Sterbini, based on the novel/memoir Les Amours du chevalier de Faublas by the revolutionary Jean-Baptiste Louvet de Couvrai, whose work was the source of the Lodoïska libretto set by Luigi Cherubini (1791), and Lodoiska set by Stephen Storace (1794), and Simon Mayr (1796). Rescue opera with an eventual happy ending.Wikipedia

  • Matilde di Shabran

    Melodramma giocoso (opera semiseria) in two acts by Gioachino Rossini to a libretto by Jacopo Ferretti after François-Benoît Hoffman’s libretto for Méhul’s Euphrosine (1790, Paris) and J. M. Boutet de Monvel's play Mathilde. First performed in Rome at the Teatro Apollo, 24 February 1821Wikipedia

  • Ricciardo e Zoraide

    Opera in two acts by Gioachino Rossini to an Italian libretto by Francesco Berio di Salsa. Based on cantos XIV and XV of Il Ricciardetto, an epic poem by Niccolò Forteguerri.Wikipedia

  • Ciro in Babilonia

    Azione sacra in two acts by Gioachino Rossini with a libretto by Francesco Aventi. First performed at the Teatro Comunale in Ferrara during Lent, 1812.Wikipedia

  • Sigismondo

    Operatic 'dramma' in two acts by Gioachino Rossini to an Italian libretto by Giuseppe Maria Foppa. Not a success and Rossini later re-used some of its music in Elisabetta, regina d'Inghilterra, The Barber of Seville, and Adina.Wikipedia

  • Adelson e Salvini

    Three-act opera semiseria composed by Vincenzo Bellini from a libretto by Andrea Leone Tottola. Based on the 1772 novel Épreuves du Sentiment by François-Thomas-Marie de Baculard d'Arnaud, and it draws on a previously performed French play of 1803 by Prospère Delamare.Wikipedia

  • Mosè in Egitto

    Three-act opera written by Gioachino Rossini to an Italian libretto by Andrea Leone Tottola, which was based on a 1760 play by Francesco Ringhieri, L'Osiride. It premièred on 5 March 1818 at the recently reconstructed Teatro San Carlo in Naples, Italy.Wikipedia

La Gazza Ladra Arias

Sentences forLa gazza ladra

  • Also in 2003, Scales voiced the speaking ('cawing') role of Magpie, the eponymous thief in a recording of Gioachino Rossini's opera La gazza ladra (The Thieving Magpie).Prunella Scales-Wikipedia
  • The period between La gazza ladra (1817) and Semiramide (1823) was marked by the production of twelve operas of little significance, with the exception of La donna del lago.La donna del lago-Wikipedia
  • 2016's season featured Puccini's La bohème, Sondheim's Sweeney Todd, Rossini's La gazza ladra (billed as The Thieving Magpie), and Ward's The Crucible.Glimmerglass Festival-Wikipedia
  • For La Scala he wrote the opera semiseriaLa gazza ladra (1817), and for Rome his version of the Cinderella story, La Cenerentola (1817).Gioachino Rossini-Wikipedia
  • The couple attend a concert at the piazza, where an orchestra plays the overture to La gazza ladra.Summertime (1955 film)-Wikipedia
  • In it, Santley sang Fernando in La Gazza Ladra with Kellogg, Trebelli, Bettini and Foli, and the title role in Rigoletto with Kellogg and the prominent tenor Gaetano Fraschini.Charles Santley-Wikipedia
  • As attendance was falling rapidly, Joanita was replaced with La pie voleuse, a Castil-Blaze adaptation of Rossini's La gazza ladra, on 23 April.Opéra-National-Wikipedia
  • After being obliged to leave Pesaro hurriedly in May 1819 (it turned out to be his last visit there), Rossini returned to Naples in early June with no projects in the offing, except to become involved with overseeing a new production of his La gazza ladra there.La donna del lago-Wikipedia
  • In 1941 he re-orchestrated La gazza ladra, reducing it to three acts.Riccardo Zandonai-Wikipedia
  • Castafiore leaves for Milan to perform in the opera La gazza ladra (Italian: The Thieving Magpie).The Castafiore Emerald-Wikipedia
  • The inclusion of buffo roles is the reason for its designation as a 'semiserio' work, similar to Rossini's La gazza ladra.Torvaldo e Dorliska-Wikipedia
  • On 14 August 1814 he appeared in Il turco in Italia at La Scala; on 31 May 1817 (again at La Scala), in the very difficult role of Fernando in La gazza ladra.Filippo Galli (bass)-Wikipedia
  • Rossini's operaLa gazza ladra and The Adventures of Tintin comic The Castafiore Emerald are based on this theme.Eurasian magpie-Wikipedia
  • In the meantime Rossini had been informed that the de Begnises had been secured for La gazza ladra.Giuseppina Ronzi de Begnis-Wikipedia
  • It re-opened again, this time in private hands, with Rossini's La gazza ladra.Teatro Malibran-Wikipedia
  • At first Ebers became the lessee of the theatre for one year only, and on 10 March 1821 the house opened with La gazza ladra, the first time that it had been heard in England.John Ebers-Wikipedia
  • In 1818, Rossini secured her as Ninetta in his La gazza ladra for the grand inauguration of the newly built Teatro Nuovo in Pesaro.Giuseppina Ronzi de Begnis-Wikipedia
  • She soon appeared in Venice, Florence, Milan, Naples, and other Italian cities, in Tancredi, La gazza ladra, Il pirata, L'elisir d'amore and other operas.Fanny Tacchinardi Persiani-Wikipedia
  • His chief rôles were Leporello (his greatest part), Geronimo the Podestà in La gazza ladra, Dandini in La Prova d' un' Opera Seria, Henry VIII in Anna Bolena the Doge in Marino Faliero, and Oroveso in Norma.Luigi Lablache-Wikipedia
  • Her other roles included Iolanthe, Hänsel, Cherubino, Pippo, and Josephine in the premiere of Malcolm Williamson's The Violins of Saint-Jacques (1966).Patricia Kern-Wikipedia
  • In 1836 she sang the roles of Ninetta in Rossini's La gazza ladra, Elvira in Bellini's I puritani, and the title role in Rossini's La Cenerentola at the Teatro La Fenice in Venice.Giuseppina Strepponi-Wikipedia
  • In 2007 he conducted 'La gazza ladra' by Gioachino Rossini at Rossini Opera Festival in Pesaro and it was released as a DVD from Dynamic.Lü Jia (conductor)-Wikipedia
  • These two plays were presented with the same long success, both in Paris and in the cities of the province and abroad ; Rossini composed his opera La gazza ladra after the second.Louis-Charles Caigniez-Wikipedia
  • John Ebers, a bookseller, took over the management of the theatre in 1821, and seven more London premieres of Rossini operas (La gazza ladra, Il turco in Italia, Mosè in Egitto, Otello, La donna del lago, Matilde di Shabran and Ricciardo e Zoraide) took place there in the following three years.Her Majesty's Theatre-Wikipedia
  • He designed the ballets of Salvatore Viganò at the beginning of the 19th century, and the world premières of Rossini’s La gazza ladra, Bellini’s Il pirata, La straniera, La sonnambula as well as Norma in 1831.Alessandro Sanquirico-Wikipedia
  • Built as the Teatro Nuovo (on the site of the original 1637 Teatro del Sole), it was inaugurated on 10 June 1818 with a performance of Gioacchino Rossini's La gazza ladra conducted by the composer in the town of his birth.Teatro Rossini (Pesaro)-Wikipedia
  • Another example is Gioacchino Rossini's La gazza ladra.Opera semiseria-Wikipedia
  • The same music is also used: an excerpt from the overture of The Thieving Magpie by Gioachino Rossini.Coon 2: Hindsight-Wikipedia
  • Ride of the Valkyries, Ravel's Boléro, Sergei Prokofiev's Montagues and Capulets and Peter and the Wolf, Gioachino Rossini's La gazza ladra, Mozart's Symphony No. 40 in G minor – 4th Movement, and music by Toronto electronica band Holy Fuck are very frequently used.Kenny vs. Spenny-Wikipedia
  • In 2015, besides performing Fiorilla and Gilda, she debuted as Folleville in Il viaggio a Reims at the Dutch National Opera, Micaëla in Carmen at La Scala, Ninetta in La gazza ladra at the Rossini Opera Festival, and Inès in L'Africaine at the Deutsche Oper Berlin.Nino Machaidze-Wikipedia

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The Thieving Magpie (La Gazza Ladra)
Live album by
Released29 November 1988
Recorded1984, 1986, 1987
GenreNeo-progressive rock
Length112:18
LabelEMI
Capitol Records
ProducerMarillion and Privet Hedge
Marillion chronology
B'Sides Themselves
(1988)
The Thieving Magpie (La Gazza Ladra)
(1988)
Seasons End
(1989)
Singles from The Thieving Magpie (La Gazza Ladra)
  1. 'Freaks (live)'
    Released: 21 November 1988
Professional ratings
Review scores
SourceRating
AllMusic[1]

The Thieving Magpie (La Gazza Ladra) is a double live album by the British neo-progressive rock band Marillion. It was named after the introductory piece of classical music the band used before coming on stage during the Clutching at Straws tour 1987–1988, the overture to Rossini's opera La gazza ladra, which translates as 'The Thieving Magpie'.The album was released shortly after singer Fish's departure from the band (and before Steve Hogarth's arrival) and was intended to document the 'Fish years'. It complements the band's first live album Real to Reel insofar as there are no overlaps. The Thieving Magpie is not a continuous live recording, but a compilation of tracks recorded at different times and places, with audible gaps between them and different moods on the individual tracks. However, the double vinyl version does include the first side of the UK number one concept album Misplaced Childhood (1985). The CD and cassette version includes the full album, as well as the track 'Freaks' – originally the b-side to 'Lavender', it was used as the lead single for The Thieving Magpie peaking at no. 18 in the UK.

The album was produced by Christopher 'Privet' Hedge, who had been Marillion's sound engineer from early on in their career.

Cover art[edit]

The cover was designed by regular Marillion contributor Mark Wilkinson, who went on to work for Fish. The front part contains photorealistic airbrushed renderings of the band members. The back cover features characters found on the covers of the previous albums, i.e. 'The Jester' (Script for a Jester's Tear), 'The Boy' (Misplaced Childhood), and 'Torch' (Clutching at Straws). The inside of the vinyl gatefold sleeve consists of a rather blurred photograph of the band on stage, circa 1986.

Release history[edit]

Originally, the album was released on double vinyl and the above-mentioned extended double CD/cassette set. In 2005, EMI Japan released a 'vinyl replica' edition, i.e. a CD in a miniaturised version of the original vinyl packaging. The track listing, however, is the same as on the original 2CD version. On 22 June 2009, EMI released a digitally remastered version (along with Recital of the Script and Live From Loreley).

Track listing[edit]

Double LP version[edit]

Side 1[edit]

  1. 'Intro: La Gazza Ladra' – 2:45
  2. 'Slàinte Mhath' – 4:49 from Clutching at Straws (1987), recorded live at Edinburgh 'The Playhouse', December 17/18/19th 1987
  3. 'He Knows You Know' – 5:12 from Script for a Jester's Tear (1983), recorded live at Sheffield 'City Hall', 6 March 1984
  4. 'Chelsea Monday' – 8:00 from Script for a Jester's Tear (1983), recorded live at Leicester 'De Montfort Hall', 5 March 1984

Side 2 (Misplaced Childhood Part 1)[edit]

  1. 'Pseudo Silk Kimono' – 2:19
  2. 'Kayleigh' – 3:52
  3. 'Lavender' – 2:27
  4. 'Bitter Suite' – 7:38
  5. 'Heart of Lothian' – 5:12

All 5 tracks recorded live at London 'Hammersmith Odeon', 9/10 January 1986

La Gazza Ladra 2008

Side 3[edit]

  1. 'Jigsaw' – 6:24 from Fugazi (1984), recorded live at Sheffield 'City Hall', 6 March 1984
  2. 'Punch & Judy' – 3:23 from Fugazi (1984), recorded live at Sheffield 'City Hall', 6 March 1984
  3. 'Sugar Mice' – 6:03 from Clutching at Straws (1987), recorded live at Edinburgh 'The Playhouse', December 17/18/19th 1987
  4. 'Fugazi' – 8:39 from Fugazi (1984), recorded live at Sheffield 'City Hall', 6 March 1984

Side 4[edit]

  1. 'Script for a Jester's Tear' – 8:45 from Script for a Jester's Tear (1983), recorded live at Sheffield 'City Hall', 6 March 1984
  2. 'Incommunicado' – 5:23 from Clutching at Straws (1987), recorded live at Edinburgh 'The Playhouse', December 17/18/19th 1987
  3. 'White Russian' – 6:14 from Clutching at Straws (1987), recorded live at Edinburgh 'The Playhouse', December 17/18/19th 1987

Double CD version[edit]

CD 1[edit]

  1. 'Intro: La Gazza Ladra' – 2:45
  2. 'Slàinte Mhath' – 4:49
  3. 'He Knows You Know' – 5:12
  4. 'Chelsea Monday' – 8:00
  5. 'Freaks' – 4:06 * recorded live at Mannheim, Germany 'Maimarktgelände', 21 June 1986
  6. 'Jigsaw' – 6:24
  7. 'Punch & Judy' – 3:23
  8. 'Sugar Mice' – 6:03
  9. 'Fugazi' – 8:39
  10. 'Script for a Jester's Tear' – 8:45
  11. 'Incommunicado' – 5:23
  12. 'White Russian' – 6:14

* CD only

CD 2 (Complete performance of Misplaced Childhood)[edit]

  1. 'Pseudo Silk Kimono' – 2:19
  2. 'Kayleigh' – 3:52
  3. 'Lavender' – 2:27
  4. 'Bitter Suite' – 7:38
  5. 'Heart of Lothian' – 5:12
  6. 'Waterhole (Expresso Bongo)' – 2:16
  7. 'Lords of the Backstage' – 6:07 (the track is not divided properly here, and continues into the first three parts of Blind Curve)
  8. 'Blind Curve' – 5:34 (this track is parts four and five of Blind Curve)
  9. 'Childhoods End?' – 2:48
  10. 'White Feather' – 4:22

All 10 tracks recorded live at London 'Hammersmith Odeon', 9/10 January 1986

References[edit]

  1. ^Rivadavia, Eduardo. Marillion: 'The Thieving Magpie' > Review at AllMusic. Retrieved 16 March 2015.
Ladra

La Gazza Ladra Trombone Excerpt

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